i get alarmed.. a lot.
like, the kind of alarming that heavies my heart more than it probably should.
i’ve come to accept the fact that being heartbroken for the things around me is a good thing; no matter how sad/upset/angry i get at the things of this world. 
the tear count doesn’t matter when it comes to someone’s life lost, broken, or destroyed.

if you follow the news at all, you know that in the last few weeks a lot of tragedies happen; the boston marathon bombing, the texas explosion, and more recently, the bangledesh collapse.
after the marathon bombing, more than a few of my friends updated their status’ with “well it’s great you guys care about boston, but the more important issues are the ones we don’t hear about; the ones about how hundreds of kids die every single day all over the world due to lack of necessities- clean water, food, health care..”

i get that. i understand your compassion. but what i don’t understand? how we can choose when to be compassionate and when to leave it on the back burner.

personally, i mourned over the boston marathon bombing. i mourned for an internet friend whose sister in law would’ve been the first little person to compete in the marathon and was half a mile away from finishing when the bombs started going off. needless to say, she couldn’t finish. still number one on her bucket list to do, she’ll try again next year. her mother however, was one of the ones anxiously waiting at the finish line to see her  daughter complete it. the bomb went off on the opposite side of her. she had to be rushed to hospital, but fortunately, she came out with a shoulder injury or two. although i don’t know these women in a face-to-face manor, my heart aches. just this one story puts this close to home.

while the tragedy of boston still lingered, an explosion happened in texas. again, more innocent lives were lost. innocent people who woke up with the intentions of coming home to their family that night. what about them?

now, eyes and hearts towards the east. the bangledesh story seems to be worsened as the days move forward. five days later and they’re still rescuing workers. the death toll rates have surpassed 350. you think you’re not affected because you don’t know any of these people personally? look down at what you’re wearing. if you’re like me you like shopping, and you especially like deals (what girl doesn’t?). however, look at down at your clothes again. look at the labels. look at where they were made. now, put a face to that country.

this isn’t to guilt trip you. this isn’t to tell you that these workers were making $30 a month in order for you to get that one big deal you run home and tell someone about. this isn’t to remind you that now, there could be one less person in that family. one less income. on top of mourning the loss of loved ones, they face the harsh reality of “what are we going to do now?” that could result into sending a child to work in a factory just like that; where working conditions don’t matter, or the minimum wage isn’t anywhere near north american standards. 

my heart is heavy. my heart will always be heavy when i turn numbers into faces, and turn those faces into families.

if you stop and think about the tragedies that happen every single day, whether on the news or not, it should be a reminder that you’re still alive. and being alive comes with great responsibility. you could ignore things that happen around you and say that “things or going to happen whether we like it or not”, or you can accept the last statement and be the one who tries to help change that. regardless whether you’re going to do something or not, at least be open to making your heart heavy.

when people start caring for everything and not just one specific thing, that’s when change becomes reality.
-s.

i get alarmed.. a lot.

like, the kind of alarming that heavies my heart more than it probably should.

i’ve come to accept the fact that being heartbroken for the things around me is a good thing; no matter how sad/upset/angry i get at the things of this world. 

the tear count doesn’t matter when it comes to someone’s life lost, broken, or destroyed.

if you follow the news at all, you know that in the last few weeks a lot of tragedies happen; the boston marathon bombing, the texas explosion, and more recently, the bangledesh collapse.

after the marathon bombing, more than a few of my friends updated their status’ with “well it’s great you guys care about boston, but the more important issues are the ones we don’t hear about; the ones about how hundreds of kids die every single day all over the world due to lack of necessities- clean water, food, health care..”

i get that. i understand your compassion. but what i don’t understand? how we can choose when to be compassionate and when to leave it on the back burner.

personally, i mourned over the boston marathon bombing. i mourned for an internet friend whose sister in law would’ve been the first little person to compete in the marathon and was half a mile away from finishing when the bombs started going off. needless to say, she couldn’t finish. still number one on her bucket list to do, she’ll try again next year. her mother however, was one of the ones anxiously waiting at the finish line to see her  daughter complete it. the bomb went off on the opposite side of her. she had to be rushed to hospital, but fortunately, she came out with a shoulder injury or two. although i don’t know these women in a face-to-face manor, my heart aches. just this one story puts this close to home.

while the tragedy of boston still lingered, an explosion happened in texas. again, more innocent lives were lost. innocent people who woke up with the intentions of coming home to their family that night. what about them?

now, eyes and hearts towards the east. the bangledesh story seems to be worsened as the days move forward. five days later and they’re still rescuing workers. the death toll rates have surpassed 350. you think you’re not affected because you don’t know any of these people personally? look down at what you’re wearing. if you’re like me you like shopping, and you especially like deals (what girl doesn’t?). however, look at down at your clothes again. look at the labels. look at where they were made. now, put a face to that country.

this isn’t to guilt trip you. this isn’t to tell you that these workers were making $30 a month in order for you to get that one big deal you run home and tell someone about. this isn’t to remind you that now, there could be one less person in that family. one less income. on top of mourning the loss of loved ones, they face the harsh reality of “what are we going to do now?” that could result into sending a child to work in a factory just like that; where working conditions don’t matter, or the minimum wage isn’t anywhere near north american standards. 

my heart is heavy. my heart will always be heavy when i turn numbers into faces, and turn those faces into families.

if you stop and think about the tragedies that happen every single day, whether on the news or not, it should be a reminder that you’re still alive. and being alive comes with great responsibility. you could ignore things that happen around you and say that “things or going to happen whether we like it or not”, or you can accept the last statement and be the one who tries to help change that. regardless whether you’re going to do something or not, at least be open to making your heart heavy.

when people start caring for everything and not just one specific thing, that’s when change becomes reality.

-s.

04/28/13 at 2:33pm
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